Fly Fishing Clear, Cub, Sedge and Bear Creeks:
.........................            ........Fly Fishing Yellowstone National Park
Checking out upper Cub Creek in
the late summer. All the sizeable
cutthroat trout have gone back to the
lake and only small cutthroat trout
remain.
Looking over Sedge Creek just off
the East Entrance Road. This
stream has only small cutthroats
after the spawning season.
This section is unusual in that it contains four creeks (Clear, Cub, Sedge and Bear) three of which flow into Yellowstone
Lake. These streams have special restrictions.

Clear Creek:
Clear Creek is a small stream that flows from the Absaroka Range into Yellowstone Lake. This stream is closed to fishing
until some time in August after the spawning trout have returned to the lake. The resident trout are very small cutthroats
averaging about 8 inches or less. You should check on the fishing regulations before fishing this stream.

Cub Creek:
Cub Creek is another small stream that flows from the Absaroka Range into Yellowstone Lake. This stream is closed to
fishing until sometimes in August after the spawning cutthroat trout have returned to the lake. The resident trout are very
small cutthroats averaging about 8 inches or less. You should check on the fishing regulations before fishing this stream.

Sedge Creek:
Sedge Creek is a small meadow creek, except for its uppermost high gradient part, that flows from the Absaroka Range
into Turbid Lake. It flows out of Turbid Lake, into Yellowstone Lake. Its fish are small cutthroats that average about 8
inches. This stream can be accessed from the Turbid Lake Trail via the Pelican Valley Trail located about three and a half
miles from Fishing Bridge east on the East Entrance Road.

Bear Creek:
Bear Creek is a small meadow creek, except for the uppermost high gradient part, that flows from the Absaroka Range
into Turbid Lake. The fish, all small cutthroats, are present in the first two miles upstream of Turbid Lake.
The stream can be accessed from the Turbid Lake Trail located about nine miles east of Fishing Bridge just off the East
Entrance Road.

Comments:
Although the period of time you can catch the cutthroats during the spawning migration is short, it may be worth taking the
time for a trip there. Currently, Clear and Cub Creeks are not open to fishing until August 11. This is due to bear activity in
the area.

Keep in mind, the streams are very important spawning grounds for native Yellowstone cutthroat trout. The population of
spawning is now only a small fraction of what it was at one time because of the lake trout in Yellowstone Lake. Although
effort is being put forth to net and remove the lake trout, the effort has so far, only slowed down the problem. Fishing
regulations require that any lake trout caught from Yellowstone Lake to be killed.

Copyright 2012 James Marsh
Thumbnails: Click on Image to enlarge
Thumbnails: Click on Image to enlarge